E-mail Link to This E-Newsletter 
 
 

Bridging Business and Workforce Development? Find Out How!

Register Right NOW for the 2nd Annual Bridging Business and Workforce Development Best Practices Conference – www.remploymentbridge.com

This is a reminder to mark your calendars and to get registered if you aren’t yet! The Centralina Workforce Development Board and the Re-Employment Bridge Institute (RBI) 2nd annual best practices conference titled Bridging Business and Workforce Development is quickly approaching!

This exciting conference will be held on Thursday June 7 – Friday June 8, 2012 at the Embassy Suites Conference Center in Concord.

The focus of the upcoming conference is to bring together private business with workforce professionals who provide services to displaced workers, the unemployed and the underemployed in response to the identified needs of business. Opportunities will be afforded to participants to remain current on innovative initiatives, idea exchange, and networking with colleagues.

Anyone who is interested in learning best practices in bridging the needs of business with workforce development is welcome to attend! The 2011 Conference had over 300 attendees from all over the nation come together to network and discuss best practices. The positive response from those that attended the event was overwhelming and many left demanding another conference for 2012. Here are just some of the comments from the previous conference:

“The Reemployment Bridge Institute is true to its name because it bridges the gap between employers and workforce development so that we are speaking the same language,” said Karen Adams, Manager of the Iredell County JobLink Career Center. “The sessions partner employers and workforce development professionals to provide information, tips, and views applicable to the commitment we as workforce development professionals make daily to enhance services to our customers, the employers and potential employees. Attending the RBI conference offered me the chance to identify the areas where I could bridge the gap and supplied the tips to enhance the relationship with my customers.”

“Finally, a workforce development conference that engages business. Nick and his team did an excellent job bringing businesses to the table to give their perspective on workforce issues and concerns,” said Reid Baker, Catawba Regional Council of Governments.

One addition this year to the conference is a featured pre-conference workshop conducted by John Metcalf, a senior member of the firm Thomas P. Miller and Associates. Metcalf is nationally recognized for his work in creating innovative integration strategies for workforce development at the community level.

Metcalf’s fast-paced pre-conference workshop will prepare participants to create a workforce delivery system to meet the needs of area businesses. Participants will leave with an outline of what it will take for their workforce system to transform itself into a more demand and quality driven system.

Interested in attending? Registration is now open for this great event! The nominal cost for this two day event is $125, if you want to attend the pre-conference session with the conference the cost is $175. You can register at www.reemploymentbridge.com or by contacting Erin Ploplis at (704) 216-7202 or by e-mail at erin.ploplis@rccc.edu.

The Re-Employment Bridge Institute is also seeking sponsors and exhibitors for their exciting and ground breaking conference! There are wonderful benefits to being a sponsor or an exhibitor for this event. For more information please click here. For more information on this please contact Erin Ploplis at (704) 216-7202 or by e-mail at erin.ploplis@rccc.edu or at www.remploymentbridge.com. And thanks to the Gaston Workforce Development Board, one of the first sponsors to sign up for this year’s conference.

The RBI is a teaching/learning institute based in Kannapolis and is funded by a two-year grant from the Centralina Workforce Development Board and the NC Department of Commerce. The Re-Employment Bridge Institute has enrolled over 1,000 business and workforce development professionals through its initial conference, workshop series and community-based consultations. The RBI is committed to sharing best practices among workforce professionals especially in addressing the needs of business.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board was a partner for the 2011 conference and is proud to be a partner again for the 2012 event. Please continue to look to the Centralina WDB monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting conference. For more information on the 2012 Re-Employment Bridge Institute Conference or on the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact Emily Clamp at (704) 348-2732 or by e-mail at eclamp@centralina.org.



Allied Health Regional Skills Partnership Unveils “Grow Your Own Workforce” Tool Kit

The Competitive Workforce Alliance Allied Health Regional Skills Partnership has developed a Career Pathway model that outlines how employers can “grow their own” skilled workers to meet workforce shortages. This innovative model is detailed in a step-by-step guide or Tool Kit that describes the specific elements of the model. It is unique in that the model is a flexible blueprint that can be adapted to various occupations and skill levels, making it ideal for any size or type of institution or groups of institutions.

To be successful, career pathways must address employer workforce needs as well as employee skill development, and potential challenges or roadblocks to advancement. The initiative must clearly state the value to the employer, explain how that value outweighs the cost, and include a thorough understanding of the challenges, especially when the career pathway targets the lowest skilled workers. This model establishes the criteria for identifying the value and the challenges, and offers specific solutions to overcome barriers and meet the challenges.

This program was successfully piloted at Carolinas Medical Center-Union in Monroe (Union County NC) with the emphasis on training incumbent workers to be physical therapist assistants. The pilot program was launched in 2010 and continues today as employees pursue their education while working full-time. View the Tool Kit at www.agreatworkforce.com/alliedhealth.cfm.

This Tool Kit is one of several innovative models developed by the Partnership with a three-year grant from the NC State Department of Commerce. When that grant cycle ended in December 2011, the Partnership focused on creating a membership-driven organization where professionals can learn about new developments in allied health careers, openly discuss challenges in meeting workforce needs and develop collaborations that successfully address allied health workforce needs.

The Partnership’s next meeting is set for Thursday April 26, 2012, and will focus on building the organization needed to fulfill its vision:

To be the greater Charlotte region’s resource of choice for education, collaboration and workforce development for Allied Health professionals and the organizations they serve.

Come meet the new leaders of the Allied Health RSP, network with healthcare, education and workforce professionals from a 16-county region, be a part of charting the course of the organization and creating the Partnership’s next big initiative. To attend the meeting and/or receive more information e-mail Emily Clamp at the Centralina Workforce Development Board at eclamp@centralina.org.


Transforming Nursing for North Carolina’s Health

Centralina WDB Director Presents to BSN and Higher Degree Taskforce

Transforming Nursing for North Carolina’s Health. That’s the mission of the NC Future of Nursing Action Coalition. The Coalition’s BSN and Higher Degree Taskforce met at Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro on Friday March 23. Centralina Workforce Development Board Executive Director David Hollars is a member of the taskforce and was asked to discuss the recently released 2012 Skills Survey of North Carolina Employers.

The goal of the BSN and Higher Degree Taskforce is to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate or higher degree to 80% by 2020 to:

(1) Improve health outcomes for North Carolinians through a higher educated nursing workforce:
(2) Expand consumer access to primary care through an increased number of advanced practice nurses; and
(3) Increase the critical pipeline of faculty to prepare an adequate nursing workforce for the future.

The taskforce seeks to do this by:

  • Implementing Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN) statewide by 2016
  • Promoting educational advancement
  • Creating a seamless educational progression system from LPN/ADN to DNP/PhD
  • Cultivating and promoting nurse faculty role.

The taskforce includes members from the NC Future of Nursing Campaign, colleges and universities, community colleges, and healthcare organizations from throughout North Carolina.

Polly Johnson, Foundation for Nursing Excellence (FFNE) and Karen Stallings, NC AHEC serve as co-chairs and champions of the taskforce. The March 23rd meeting featured an update on the RIBN (Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses) project with community college and university systems, results of the survey of program pre-requisites, and a strategic communications update.

In his presentation on the 2012 Skills Survey of North Carolina Employers, David Hollars noted that communication and interpersonal skills were still a key element missing among potential employees in the healthcare field. David also discussed training for incumbent workers and the needed for higher skilled and degreed individuals for the 21st century workforce.

After lunch, small groups of taskforce participants dealt with the topics of Creating a seamless educational progression system from LPN/ADN to DNP/PhD and Promoting Educational Advancement.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is proud to be involved with the NC Future of Nursing Action Coalition and its BSN and Higher Degree Taskforce. The Board believes that a well-educated and well-trained workforce will help the healthcare profession continue to grow as it deals with the many challenges that lie ahead. For more information on the RIBN project and the work of the Coalition, please click here. For more information on how your efforts can benefit from the resources of the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org.


Marketable Skills for the Healthcare Field

New Program Helps Stanly County Residents Become Nurse Assistants

More than a dozen Stanly County residents are taking part in a pilot program to become certified as home care nurse assistants through a grant and the collaborative effort of three local organizations. North Carolina was one of six states selected to receive a PHCAST (Personal and Home Care Aide State Training) grant to train direct care workers in long term care settings.

Bringing the program to Albemarle was a joint effort among Stanly Community College (SCC), Stanly County JobLink Career Center/Division of Employment Security (DES) and the City of Albemarle Public Housing Department.

The program is held Mondays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. at the Public Housing Department’s Family Life Center in Albemarle.

Prior to the start of the program, letters were sent out to residents of public housing informing them of this new opportunity.

“We felt like it was a good opportunity for residents to gain a marketing skill and help get a job,” said Emily Moose, of the Department of Housing, adding that although letters were originally sent to residents, the program was open to anyone who was interested.

Stanly Community College, which was the applicant of the grant, provides the instruction for the course. According to Stanly CC’s Rita Walter, Amhurst was selected as the site for the pilot program due to its proximity to individuals who would benefit from it. “It is closer to folks who need it,” Walter said.

The certification program, Walter explained, functions as any other course offered on-site at Stanly CC. “We consider this as part of the campus.”

The Stanly County JobLink Career Center/Division of Employment Security, formerly the Employment Security Commission, is assisting several individuals with the cost of tuition, books, uniforms and other supplies, through the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) program. The WIA was established to help eligible dislocated workers and adults become gainfully employed by funding education and training related to employment. The WIA funds are monitored and administered by the Centralina Workforce Development Board.

The program, according to HCNA Instructor Joyce Kimrey, is comprised of four phases, with clinicals beginning in the third phase. “Each phase is a little more in-depth,” Kimrey said.

The need for certified home care nurse assistants will continue to rise as the Baby Boomer generation ages and more individuals elect to remain out of nursing homes.

“There is a push towards more focus on training for home care so more people can stay at home,” Kimrey said.

Jahia Cole signed up for the class to become certified as a CNA and to hopefully use the experience as a stepping stone to further her career. “I hope to go further in this profession,” Cole said. “I think this program is a good starting point for those who want to go into the medical field.”

Alyaha Bailey found out about the certification program from a friend. She was excited about the opportunity to go into the nursing field, which is something she has always wanted to do. “I’ve always wanted to help people,” Bailey said, adding that the program is a good learning experience. “You learn basic skills. It preps you to become a CNA and to get work experience.”

Destiney Cole would like to follow in the footsteps of her mother, who was an LPN. “Growing up, I wanted to be like her,” Cole said, adding that becoming certified will open up her options when it comes to finding a job.

Although enrollment in the home care certified nurse assistant training class has ended, funding is available for other programs through the WIA. Anyone interested in enrolling in WIA funded training services is asked to contact Burnetta Maske or Jane Balfrey at the Stanly County JobLink Career Center in Albemarle at (704) 982-2183.

Please continue to look to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting development in our region! For more information on this grant or on the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org.

Front row (staggered): Eddie Baldwin, Charlene McRae, Joyce Kimrey, RN (Instructor), Melanie Nelson, Jahia Cole, Destiney Cole, Kristi Owens; back row (staggered): Cheryl Paul, Debra Willis, Ladisha Gibson, Alyaha Bailey, Darkisha Pemberton.


Skill-UP for Your New Career!

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and the R3 Center Receive Project Skill-UP Grant

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and its R3 Center have received a $5,000 Project Skill-UP (PSU) Grant from the North Carolina Tobacco Trust Fund Commission through the North Carolina Community College System.

Since 2008, Rowan-Cabarrus has received three prior awards totaling $110,000 to provide career assistance to local tobacco workers, their family members and local businesses adversely impacted by changes in the tobacco industry.

The objective of Project Skill-UP is to provide education and training for individuals in the tobacco industry, including career exploration activities, achieving educational credentials and job placement.

Since the beginning of this program, Rowan-Cabarrus has served 933 PSU eligible clients at the R3 Center in Kannapolis. For those clients, the R3 Center has provided more than 2,500 intensive career services through individual appointments and workshops. To date, 155 individuals have received scholarship funds for training designed to return them to the workforce. This year’s award will be used to provide training scholarships for dislocated workers.

The college’s Kannapolis-based R3 Center is working to identify and recruit persons, family members and businesses in Cabarrus and Rowan counties who are facing negative circumstances caused by significant shifts in the tobacco industry.

The R3 Center offers workshops on workplace readiness and career development and conducts individual career counseling sessions. In addition, the R3 Center assists individuals in achieving career readiness certification, a national credential program that helps job applicants show proof of their basic skills to employers.

R3 Center counselors work personally with clients under the grant to assess their need for additional training and/or education. Once clients have developed individual employment plans, they are eligible to apply for a Project Skill-UP scholarship to assist them with short-term training.

The N.C. General Assembly created the N.C. Tobacco Trust Fund Commission in 2000 to help members of the tobacco community — including farmers, tobacco workers and related businesses — lessen the impact of declining tobacco production. In establishing the commission, legislators recognized the strong role agriculture, tobacco in particular, has played historically in the state’s economy.

Located at 200 West Ave., the R3 Center is a career development center established by Rowan-Cabarrus Community College to assist displaced workers, those who are unemployed or under-employed.

The center’s mission is built on three Rs — a refocus on individual skills and interests, retraining and further education, and partnering with other workforce development agencies to secure career-oriented re-employment.

All R3 Center services are provided at no cost to the customer. The center’s normal office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

The R3 Center partners with other workforce development agencies, including the Centralina Workforce Development Board, JobLink Career Centers of Cabarrus and Rowan counties, and other area community colleges.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is a proud partner with Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and the R3 Center. The Board is happy to see them continue on with this project for the region and looks forward to more future successes! For more information about the R3 Center and its services and programs, including Project Skill-UP, please call 704-216-7201, or visit the center’s website at www.rccc.edu/r3center/. For more information on the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org.


Changing Lives One Success at a Time

Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Foundation Honors Students

On Thursday March 1, 2012 the Rowan-Cabarrus Community College Foundation sponsored a Scholarship Luncheon honoring recipients as well as donors. It was attended by over 300 people at The Embassy Suites in Concord.

This was a time to celebrate the many successes of the student recipients and hear their stories as well as a time to thank donors. Those in attendance also had the opportunity to view a newly released video highlighting Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and all that is happening at the college.

Here are a few of the details you might not know about Rowan-Cabarrus Community College:

1. 22,000 students attend annually

2. 6,400 students are full time students

3. Rowan-Cabarrus CC is among the fastest growing community colleges in the state

4. 60% of students receive some financial aid so scholarships are vital to the success of the students

David Hollars, Executive Director of the Centralina Workforce Development Board and other key local workforce development partners attended this wonderful celebration.

Here is the best news! Over $70,000 was raised from this luncheon and contributions continue to come in to the foundation. What this means is that the college can continue to change lives for those in our communities.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is a proud partner with Rowan-Cabarrus Community College. The Board congratulates all those individuals that graduated and are seeking their goals in life! The Board knows the value of an education and the impact that it has not only on the student but the student’s family and the well being of our communities. For more information on the Foundation, please visit RCCC Foundation’s website. For more information on this event or on the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org.

Dr. Carol Spaulding, President of Rowan-Cabarrus Community College poses with college staff members at the recent Scholarship Luncheon held on Thursday March 1, 2012.


Tops in the Nation Again!

Mooresville-Statesville is Top “Micropolitan” Area Again According to Site Selection Magazine

Congratulations go out to the Mooresville-Statesville area! The number of economic development projects in the Mooresville-Statesville Micropolitan area nearly doubled in 2011 putting the area once again on the top of Site Selection Magazine’s Top Micropolitan List for the sixth time in eight years.

Placing on the Top Micropolitan list isn’t easy. In order to meet the magazine’s criteria, a project for a new or expanding industry must include one of the following measures: capital investment of at least $1 million, creation of 50 or more new jobs or new construction of at least 20,000 square feet.

With 28 qualifying projects, Statesville-Mooresville outpaced runner-up Wooster, Ohio, by seven projects. The micropolitan area logged in 17 qualifying projects in 2010.

“Iredell County has been a consistent performer when it comes to economic development,” said Statesville Regional Development Executive Director Mike Smith.

Many local officials, including Mooresville Mayor Miles Atkins and Iredell County Commissioner Ken Robertson, say the award highlights Iredell’s business-friendly climate.

“Our area is consistently viewed as a great place to locate a business,” Robertson said in a press release. “Our business-friendly environment, low tax rates, low electricity rates, dependable work force, excellent quality of life and superior public school systems provide potential employers with a wide range of positive reasons to locate here.”

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a micropolitan area is as a rural county where the largest city’s population does not exceed 50,000 people.

"The long-term success of this community can only be attributed to the political and businesses leadership that continues to focus on jobs and healthy business growth to improve quality of life for the area," said Mooresville-South Iredell Economic Development Corporation (MSIEDC) Executive Director Robby Carney. “The MSIEDC could not be happier to once again reclaim the No.1 micropolitan status.”

North Carolina jumped to 4th place in the 2011 Governor’s Cup Site Selection magazine, after finishing 6th in 2010. The annual designation is awarded annually based on the number of new and expanded corporate facilities as tracked by Conway Data Inc.’s New Plant Database, according to a press release from the N.C. Governor’s office.

The state was ranked number one in the South Atlantic Region.

Please continue to look to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting development in our region!

The Mooresville-Statesville area was named one of the Top Micropolitan Areas by Site Selection Magazine. MSIEDC Members and Community Leaders pose for a quick picture with the award.

More Jobs for Kannapolis

Ei, Inc. Expansion to Lead to Creation of 119 Jobs

The proposed expansion of pharmaceutical manufacturer Ei, Inc. in Kannapolis could mean an additional $28.45 million investment in the community and the creation of 119 jobs with an average salary of $41,406.

Ei, Inc., a pharmaceutical manufacturer in Kannapolis, has asked for tax incentive grants to help expand its operation, which is headquartered at 2865 North Cannon Boulevard in the former Wal-Mart building in the Rowan County side of Kannapolis. The company has operated at its current location since 2007 and has 210 employees at the site.

Ei is in discussions with a North Carolina-based biomaterials company to become its development and manufacturing partner on a new keratin intellectual property platform. Keratins are a class of structural proteins with unique physical, chemical and biological characteristics that are designed to promote soft and hard tissue repair, and regeneration by providing an environment to support the body’s natural healing process, according to Ei.

The company’s potential new customer is considering a variety of options, including the development of an internal manufacturing capability and outsourcing to a contract manufacturer. Ei is one of several contract manufacturers in the U.S. and Canada under consideration. Ei would need to expand its operations to meet the needs of its new partner, according to Rowan Works.

Ei has requested an incentive grant under Kannapolis’ Industrial Development Grant Program. Based on its expansion and proposed investment schedule, Ei would be eligible for $319,039 over three years. The company has also applied to the state of North Carolina, Rowan County and the N.C. Biotechnology Center for economic development support.

Ei was originally known as Harmony Labs. The company started in Landis in 1983 as a contract manufacturer. Ei is an authorized drug manufacturer in the United States, Canada, Malaysia, Russia and Turkey. The company is a full-service contract developer and manufacturer of products including prescription pharmaceuticals, over-the-counter drugs, therapeutic skin care products and animal health products.

Under Kannapolis’ adopted Industrial Development Grant Program, companies are eligible to apply for a three-year grant, supporting their investment in Kannapolis. Grants are calculated on a percentage of the actual property taxes paid to the city. The city has three grant levels: Level one is based on a minimum $3 million investment; level two is based on a minimum $50 million investment; and level three is based on a minimum $100 million investment. The proposed Ei expansion meets the $3 million grant level category because the anticipated investment would be $28.45 million.

Rowan Works officials said the project, which is expected to add a minimum of 119 new jobs, would have an average pay of $19.76 per hour, which is greater than the average wage in Rowan County of $19 per hour. The company also offers a comprehensive employee benefits package that includes health insurance and a matching 401K program.

Please continue to look to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting development in our region!


Breaking News!

Robert Bosch is Expanding and Adding Jobs in Lincoln County

Robert Bosch Tool Corporation will add 10 jobs to its Lincolnton (Lincoln County) facility as it spends $3.5 million to boost capacity. Bosch will spend most of the money on machinery for its abrasives business at the plant that’s been in Lincoln County for 35 years, says David Lee, Bosch’s Lincolnton packaging and quality director.

Bosch has already started hiring for the expansion. The company has 183 employees at the plant, located on N.C. Highway 150 on the southwest side of town.

“Bosch is a great example of how the incentive program can benefit our existing industries and assist in their growth opportunities,” says Kara Brown, spokeswoman for Lincoln Economic Development Association.

Robert Bosch Tool Corporation was one of the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s previous recipients of the Incumbent Worker funding . This grant allowed the company to maintain its current workforce and adapt to the changing economy. The Board congratulates the company on this wonderful expansion!

Please continue to look to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting development in our region!


Local Business Honored

Green Pieces Recycling is Named Small Business of the Year

Green Pieces Recycling was named the 2011 Small Business of the Year at the Stanly County Chamber of Commerce’s annual meeting on Monday January 30, 2012.

Green Pieces Recycling began offering a curbside recycling service for residential, commercial, educational institutions and nonprofits in 2008.

Since its establishment three years ago, Green pieces Recycling has increased sales by 200 percent through its partnerships with local businesses, suppliers and contractors. This increase in sales has allowed the company to expand its commercial market recycling program into the Charlotte Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).

Green Pieces Recycling has expanded its services to include confidential document shredding, Ewaste collection and onsite waste assessments. In addition, the company has implemented a new recycling program called ZeroSort which allows all recyclables to be placed into a single roll cart.

One of the major challenges the company has had to face is balancing production costs with rising fuel and hauling fees. Recyclables must be transported to Mecklenburg and Rowan counties because Stanly County does not have a recycling materials recovery center. In response to this challenge, a central processing and transfer center was developed in downtown Albemarle to compact and haul bulk recyclables in a more cost efficient manner. As a result, Green Pieces Recycling has been able to reduce operating costs by 20 percent.

Green Pieces Recycling currently employs five individuals and participates with Vocational Rehab of Albemarle in its internship program.

Green Pieces Recycling serves on the boards of Keep Stanly Beautiful, Stanly County Environmental Affairs, and Albemarle Parks and Recreation. In addition, the organization is involved in school fundraisers, has partnered with Stanly Community Christian Ministries and the city of Albemarle, and donates to breast cancer research on behalf of participating clients through its pink rollcarts.

Lee Allen of RE/MAX Town & Country, the 2010 Small Business of the Year, congratulated this year’s nominees. Lee explained that each year he selects a word to focus on. Last year’s word, Allen said, was “service.”

“This year’s word was perseverance. I believe that’s what this award really represents,” Allen said.

Upon receiving the 2011 Small Business of the Year award, Green Pieces Recycling owner Steve Megson thanked all of the nominees.

Megson said that although the journey to success has been hard, he’s had a fun three years.

“We probably recycle now 10,000 to 15,000 pounds a day and for a small company, that’s a lot,” Megson said.

Megson urged anyone who hasn’t done so to take a trip to Morrow Mountain and gaze towards the west at the landfill.

“You think it’s not your issue, but it is. We all generate five pounds of trash every day and a lot of that can be recycled,” Megson said.

Megson thanked the cities of Locust and Albemarle for their support and Stanly Community College for being a green campus. In addition, Megson expressed his appreciation to his staff, the Stanly County Chamber of Commerce and Stanly County residents.

“I really want to say thanks to the community,” Megson said.

“People have to want to recycle for it to work.”

To be eligible for the Small Business of the Year award, a business must have 50 or fewer employees and must be a current member of the Stanly County Chamber of Commerce. Each finalist submitted an application which required responses in four areas of business: (1) stability and growth; (2) innovation; (3) response to challenge; and (4) community service.

Finalists are selected by a committee of representatives from the community who then choose an overall winner.

The nominee’s for this year’s award also included Albemarle Sweet Shop, Off the Square Restaurant and Seven Oaks Doors and Hardware. The Small Business of the Year award is sponsored by Stanly Community College.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is a proud partner with the Stanly County Chamber of Commerce and Stanly Community College. The Board would like to congratulate Green Pieces Recycling on receiving this wonderful honor! For more information on this please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by email at dhollars@centralina.org.

Green Pieces was named Small Business of the Year. Owner Steve Megson poses with Stanly Community College President Brenda Kays.


Industries Recognized for Milestones

Lincoln Economic Development Association Honors Local Businesses

Local industry leaders gathered for the 2012 Milestone Achievement Awards Ceremony at the Lincoln Cultural Center on Thursday March 15, 2012 afternoon to honor businesses that have been in Lincoln County for significant periods of time.

The event, which was sponsored by the Lincoln Economic Development Association (LEDA) and is in its eighth year, honored 20 different manufacturers and distributors who have been operating from between five and 60 years.

LEDA Board Chair Tom Anderson opened the ceremony and noted that award recipients have been able to stay in business despite a tough economic environment.

Lincoln County Board of Commissioners Chair Alex Patton and Lincolnton Mayor John Gilleland also made comments, with both taking the opportunity to thank the attending industries for their contributions to the county.

“Thank you for the business you generate in Lincoln County,” Patton said, noting that the industries are “here by choice.”

In introducing Mohican Mills, the day’s biggest award recipient, Anderson said the company has “seen the good, the bad and, in some cases, the ugly” over its 60 years of operation.

Jerry Deese, corporate vice president and chief financial officer, accepted the award on behalf of all employees of the company.

Deese, who has been with Mohican Mills for 34 years, said they have received a lot of support from the city and county throughout the years. He also attributed the company’s success to the “dedication of employees, current and retired.”

“Without those employees, none of this would be possible,” he added.

Over the past year, the company has started to manufacture NFL fabrics in partnership with Nike, which has resulted in the creation of 150 new positions. Deese stressed that they had been “blessed with that business.”

Kara Brown, LEDA’s existing business manager, said the awards served as an opportunity to show gratitude for the local industries.

“They need to know we appreciate them being here,” she noted.

Other 2012 Milestone Achievement Award recipients included:
Five years: Carolina Non-Wovens, Purr Performance, Race City Steel, Room & Board and UTC Climate, Controls & Security
10 years: Allied Separation and Cataler North America
15 years: American Tire, Calico Coatings, Performance Research and Sponsor Services
25 years: Acton Engineering, Lawing Marble and South Fork Industries
30 years: Bob’s Pallet and Katie Wood Incorporated
40 years: Lincoln County Fabricators, Salem Industries and Thornburg Machine

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is a proud partner with the Lincoln Economic Development Association. The Board congratulates all the local businesses that were honored at this great event! For more information on the Ceremony please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by email at dhollars@centralina.org.

Jerry Deese displays the award given to Mohican Mills for 60 years membership with the Lincoln Economic Development Association.

Hospital Reaches Out to Target Audience with New Center

Carolinas Medical Center – Union Adding Women’s Center

Carolinas Medical Center-Union will add a three-story Women’s Center as part of a $57 million expansion that will raise the hospital’s total bed count by 49, to 182.

The board of Carolinas HealthCare System, which manages the Monroe (Union County) hospital, approved the project Tuesday March 13, 2012 at its quarterly board meeting.

Dr. Steve Houser, who represents CMC-Union on the system board, said the maternity center will attract women, who often make family decisions on healthcare. The project will enable the hospital to “take some of the market share” from Presbyterian Hospital Matthews, and “keep people in Union County,” Houser said.

Plans to build a 24-bed women’s center – and to add 25 beds to the existing hospital – were approved last year by state health officials who identified the need for more beds in Union County, where the population has grown nearly 60 percent over the last decade.

The new women’s center will have 82,000 square feet in a tower attached to the existing CMC-Union. All rooms will serve patients from labor and delivery through recovery and postpartum care.

About 23,000 square feet, to be vacated by relocation of the obstetrics department, will be renovated for the 25 additional beds. There will also be a new main entrance, an expanded lobby and more parking. Completion is expected in 2015. Union County, which owns the Monroe hospital, recently renegotiated a 50-year lease with Carolinas HealthCare to continue management.

The region’s largest hospital system, Carolinas HealthCare owns, manages or leases more than 30 hospitals across the Carolinas, including 874-bed Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. The public, non-profit system retains its earnings and reinvests them in expansion and improvements. Carolinas Medical Center –Union is also a former recipient of Incumbent Worker funding from the Centralina Workforce Development Board for the retraining and reskilling of their workforce.

Please continue to look to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting development in our region!


Small Business Talks and Cabarrus County Listens

Survey Shows What Small Business Want and Need for Future Growth

Small and home-based businesses in Cabarrus County want less bureaucracy and red tape, more consistency between county and municipal government bodies, and to develop a local small business alliance, according to a recent study.

Cabarrus County formed the Council for a Sustainable Local Economy last year and hired consultant Michael Shuman to do a study to help guide future decisions to promote and grow the local economy.

Shuman performed a leakage analysis of Cabarrus County, identifying all those sectors of the economy where a community is “unnecessarily importing goods or services.”

The first half of the study was presented in December 2011. Shuman told Cabarrus County Commissioners then that increasing reliance on local products and services could generate as many as 28,292 new jobs based just on local demand, paying $1.2 billion in annual wages.

Creating policies and education programs to encourage folks to increase use of local products and services by just 25 percent would mean about 7,073 new jobs for Cabarrus County, according to Shuman’s report.

This month, Shuman released the second half of his study, which analyzed local strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the local economy. It also included telephone interviews with 15 small businesses and 10 home-based businesses.

“Many of the small and home-based businesses really are frustrated,” Shuman said. “It is difficult for them to access information. We heard a lot of concern about lack of uniformity about certain town regulations and certain county regulations. All of this is really just part of customer service and it’s worth looking into.”

Some of the suggestions from those interviewed were: looser signage policies, deregulation of zoning law and building codes, a better method of bringing problems to the attention of policy makers, and a one-stop advocate for small businesses.

Shuman said local businesses that were contacted for the study expressed interest in developing a small business alliance.

“Small businesses feel that they do not have a sufficiently clear voice within the existing institutions,” Shuman said.

Another concern is how difficult it can be to obtain a loan and grow a small business, adding jobs to the local economy, according to the report.

“There is a lot of interest and frankly concern around the difficulties in obtaining capital,” Shuman said. “We tested the idea of using municipal bonds as one source of funds.”

Other communities across the country faced with the same economic concerns have considered this idea. Portland, Ore., is one example. The city has considered offering low-interest loans for residents and small businesses.

Shuman said many of the small businesses he spoke to have had good experiences with the Rowan-Cabarrus Community College and would be interested in ways to expand the college’s aid to local small and growing businesses.

There also was much interest in developing incubators for small businesses that are just starting.

Shuman also suggested considering a bidding process for incentive grants.

“It’s simple and frankly it has not been done around the country,” he said. “If you decide there is a certain amount of funding either in the tax base or in other funds that you are prepared to put out there in the name of job development, rather than feeling like there’s one great deal on the table, it is wiser to have a steady stream of applications and look at what is the best one.

“That gives you the ability to have a sounder judgment about whether a special deal that comes to the table is worth it or not,” he said. “The important thing is to have a process that’s open so that every business, big and small, local and non local can participate fairly.”

The study will be used by the Council for a Sustainable Economy to develop recommendations for policy changes that could help improve the local economy.

Please continue to look to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for updates on this exciting development in our region!

 

January 2012
(Source: NC Employment Security Commission)
County
Unemployment Rate
Persons Employed
Anson
12.0%
9,608
Cabarrus
9.8%
81,084
Iredell
11.1%
72,065
Lincoln
11.5%
34,128
Rowan
11.5%
62,086
Stanly
11.1%
26,892
Union
9.1%
90,333
Centralina WDB Region
10.5%
376,196
State of NC
10.5%
4,207,205

For more information on employment, click here


Centralina WDB Leaders Share and Learn in Washington DC

National Association of Workforce Boards Forum A Great Success

On Saturday March 10 – Tuesday March 13, 2012, the National Association of Workforce Boards (NAWB) held its annual Workforce Forum in Washington, D.C. The NAWB hosts an annual workforce forum each year to convene stakeholders, businesses and political leaders in discussions to find solutions to workforce challenges. The forum was extremely well attended with over 1,400 professionals enjoying the conference sessions and forum keynotes.

In addition to these keynote presentations, numerous workshops were held to inform and engage the participants in workforce issues. Centralina Workforce Development Board’s Executive Director, David Hollars was one of the presenters in the workshop on Economy, Energy, and the Environment (E3): The Board Role in Assisting in Local Communities. David also served as a panelist at the Sunday afternoon session entitled Board Development – Continuous Improvement – Lessons from High-Performing Boards.

Some of the other workshops that were offered at the conference were titled Workforce and Economic Development, The Human Capital Pipeline, Platform to Employment: A Social Enterprise Putting 99ERS Back to Work, and 2012: The Year of Placements.

Centralina WDB Chair, Janet Hudson with Brooks Food Group (Union County) and Centralina WDB Vice-Chair Bob Stowe with Columbus McKinnon (Anson County) both attended the forum as well.

“(The forum) was a most informative and engaging experience,” said Centralina WDB Vice-Chair Bob Stowe.

Centralina WDB Chair Janet Hudson summed up her experience at the NAWB conference by saying, “As a new board chair, I am always looking for ways to improve our board’s experiences and keeping the board engaged. We are going through a changing environment both at the National and State levels. This can change the way we offer services locally. The good part is that we can creatively enhance the way we operate. The bad part is that there is no clear path for the boards yet. Meeting with board members from around the country helps me see what other have done, and what has work and not worked. They boards that I was most interested in talking to were those similar to the Centralina WDB. That is those whose areas are spread out and mostly rural. For example those boards use conference calls and video conferencing for their committee meetings. While it is important for the board meetings themselves to be a place where all board members get together. I don’t feel that committee meetings should be dictated by geography. If you are located in Wadesboro, but want to participate in a committee that meets in Lincolnton, you should be able to so without driving for hours to and from the meeting."

"Finally, I get a lot out of finding out what the staff has to do. Each year after the Conference, boards go to Capitol Hill to speak with our Congress men and women and/or their staff members. But that’s not the only place directors, staff and board members can interact with their legislators. We can all meet with our county commissioners and our district’s state and national Congress men and women when they are in the area. We should all be advocates for our workforce system and be sure they know what we do,” said Hudson.

Some of the excellent speakers featured at the forum included US Department of Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, Senator Richard Blumenthal, and a number of congressional and White House staffers explaining the issues and challenges facing workforce development.

Rick Stephens, Senior VP of HR and Administration of the Boeing Company and Jonas Prising, President of the Americans Manpower Group were also featured speakers. Their presentations were focused on the changing dynamics of the workforce and employer needs and how these relate to workforce development and the need for funding through the Workforce Investment Act.

NAWB represents business-led Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs) that coordinate and leverage workforce strategies with education and economic development stakeholders within their local communities, to ensure that state and local workforce development and job training programs meet the needs of employers. NAWB is the only association that advocates for Workforce Investment Boards. NAWB works closely with policy makers in Washington, DC to inform national strategy as it relates to WIBs and our partners in education, economic development, labor and business.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is a proud partner with the National Association of Workforce Boards. The Board thanks the NAWB for another great and informative forum this year! For more information on the National Association of Workforce Board, please visit their site at www.NAWB.org. To view materials from the forum please click here. For more information on the 2012 NAWB Forum or on the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org.


The Centralina Workforce Development Board is in YOUR Community!

During the month of March 2012, the Centralina Workforce Development Board has been actively involved with events, seminars, training sessions, and other meetings all designed to help build a better workforce for our region. Beyond our involvement with the National Association of Workforce Board conference, the Game of Life event in Mooresville and the Allied Health Regional Skills Partnership, here are some the activities of the Board members and WDB staff for March:

Mooresville-South Iredell Economic Development Commission meeting – held on Monday March 5 at the Charles Mack Citizens Center in Mooresville. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars participated in this meeting.

Capital Area Workforce Development Board’s Youth Summit – held on Tuesday March 6 at Wake Technical Community College in Raleigh. Centralina WDB Youth Program Specialist Natasha Pender participated in this event. The summit included workshops on responsible use of social media, budgeting and a panel discussion on healthy lifestyles and relationships. The summit also featured a resource fair with college and university representatives, employers, and community agencies

Mooresville-South Iredell Chamber of Commerce – Workforce/Education Taskforce meeting - held on Thursday March 8 at Mitchell Community College in Mooresville. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars participated in this meeting and presented findings from the 2012 Skills Survey of North Carolina employers.

Youth Symposium - hosted by the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority – held on Saturday March 10 at JF Hurley YMCA in Salisbury. Centralina WDB Youth Program Specialist Natasha Pender participated and made a presentation on the WIA Youth program, the Centralina WDB Youth Council, and the upcoming NC Youth Summit.

Create It, Make It, Move It planning meeting – held on Wednesday March 14 at Central Piedmont Community College. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars participated in this meeting along with Centralina COG Executive Director Jim Prosser and COG Economic Development Director Mike Manis. The meeting was chaired by CPCC President Dr. Tony Zeiss.

Stanly Community College – Electric Lineman training program development meeting – held on Thursday March 15 at Stanly Community College in Albemarle. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars participated in this meeting along with representatives from Stanly CC, Electricities, City of Albemarle, and local utility and power suppliers on starting an electric lineman training program at the college.

NC REAL Enterprises planning/information meeting – held on Monday March 19 at Centralina WDB offices. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars, WDB Business Services Representative Vail Carter, and WDB Youth Program Specialist Natasha Pender met with Tom Brown and Arlene Childers regarding partnership between Centralina WDB and NC REAL in promoting entrepreneurship efforts in rural counties in the region. Provided contacts for expanding their services across the state and developing online training

Mooresville Graded Schools Career Bridge meeting – held on Monday March 19 at NF Woods School in Mooresville. David Hollars, Centralina WDB Executive Director, participated in this meeting which is an advisory board for career and technical education. Group finalized plans for Career Bridge Summit to be held on Thursday March 29 at Charles Mack Citizens Center in Mooresville.

Mooresville Area Personnel Association (MAPA) meeting – held on Tuesday March 20 at Mooresville Town Hall. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars participated in this meeting along with members of Career Bridge Council, Mooresville Graded Schools, City of Mooresville, and local employers to address concerns regarding internships, apprenticeships, and other work-based learning opportunities.

America’s Edge meeting – held on Tuesday March 27 at Charlotte Regional Partnership offices. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars participated in this meeting along with CRP Vice-President David Swenson, Susan Gates from America’s Edge, and John Metcalf to discuss the involvement of local employers in promoting early childhood education as a key to future workforce development efforts.

NC Workforce Development Partnership Conference planning committee meeting – held on Tuesday March 27 in Raleigh. Centralina WDB Youth Program Specialist Natasha Pender is serving as a member of the committee planning for the state conference on October 31-November 2 in Greensboro.

PK-16 Initiatives: Career and College Promise Programs meeting – held on Thursday March 29 at Central Piedmont Community College. Centralina WDB Executive Director David Hollars served as a panelist at this meeting conducted by Assistant Secretary Brenda Dann-Messier, US Department of Education – Office of Adult and Vocational Education.

Workforce Business Development and Assistance – provided by Vail Carter, Centralina WDB Business Services Representative for the following area companies:

  • Incumbent Workforce Development Program contract monitoring with Grouse Industries. Met with Jonathan Wade and Joe Sansone to conduct employee interviews. The interviews were conducted at the company facility in Concord (Cabarrus County) – March 1.
     
  • Participated in meeting of the Workforce Development Boards’ Business Services Representatives at the NC Workforce Development Training Center in Raleigh. Conducted a one hour presentation on the details of the 2012 Skills Survey of NC Employers findings – March 5.
     
  • Presented at the Business and Employer Services Professionals graduation event held at the N.C. Workforce Development Training Center in Raleigh. The presentation focused on actions that have been taken in the Centralina Workforce Development Board service area to improve service delivery as a result of the findings published in Closing the Gap- 2012 Skills Survey of N.C. Employers – March 5.
     
  • Conducted final contract monitoring of the Incumbent Workforce Development Program contract with Grouse Industries. Interviewed Holly Grouse, Vice President of the company to collect insight on the effectiveness of the training contract and program compliance – Concord (Cabarrus County) – March 7
     
  • Networked with workforce and community development professionals at the N.C. Indian Unity Conference held in Charlotte at the Renaissance Hotel. Discussed the findings of the 2012 Skills Survey of N.C. Employers with Mr. Greg Richardson, Executive Director of the N.C. Commission of Indian Affairs. Also discussed the upcoming Reemployment Bridge conference with Mr. Kerry Bird staff member with the commission and distributed flyers for the conference. Also met Representative Charles Graham, member of the N.C. House of Representatives – March 8.
     
  • Participated in strategic input meeting hosted by Duke Energy and North Carolina State University’s Industrial Extension Service. The meeting focused on strategies for sustaining and expanding the E3 Program in North Carolina. Centralina Workforce Development Board was asked to provide input on behalf of the workforce development community – March 12.
     
  • Conducted final contract monitoring of the Incumbent Workforce Development Program contract with Hendrick Motorsports, LP of Concord. Interviewed Mr. Matt Cochran, IT Manager with the company to collect insight on the effectiveness of the training contract and program compliance – Concord (Cabarrus County) – March 14.
     
  • Participated in strategic input session hosted by Monroe Economic Development and facilitated by N.C. State University’s Industrial Extension Service staff. Goal of the session was to strategize on how best to service the manufacturing community as the economy recovers and business begins to develop new markets – Monroe (Union County) – March 21.
     
  • Presented at the Mooresville Graded School District’s Career Bridge event held at the Mooresville Citizens Center. The presentation was entitled Workforce Development Trends in the Region. The presentation was targeted at students, parents and teachers – Mooresville (Iredell County) – March 29.

These are only a few examples of how your Centralina Workforce Development Board is actively involved with our partners in our counties every month. To find out more about getting involved with the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org or visit our website at www.centralinaworks.com. The Centralina Workforce Development – The Competitive Force in Our Global Economy.

READ SIMILAR NEWS


Going Once, Going Twice, Sold As Tops in the State!

Carolina Auction Academy and Stanly Community College Receive Award

The Carolina Auction Academy (CAA) at Stanly Community College (SCC) recently won an advertising award in a statewide competition through the Auctioneers Association of North Carolina (AANC).

The advertising campaign, created by Stanly CC’s marketing and communications department, entailed an auctioneering video, a creative website presence, and a public relations campaign. Individuals are encouraged to view the video on SCC-TV Time Warner Cable Channel 21 or at the college’s website at www.stanly.edu.

“It’s truly a blessing to be able to work with such talented and outstanding individuals,” noted Michelle Peifer, Director of Marketing and Communications at Stanly CC. “We are thrilled to be recognized for our work and want to thank CAA for nominating our team for this award.”

The Centralina Workforce Development Board is a proud partner with Stanly Community College and The Carolina Auction Academy. The Board congratulates the Academy and the Community College on receiving this outstanding award! Carolina Auction Academy is accredited by the North Carolina Auctioneer Licensing Board and South Carolina Auctioneer Commission. For more information, please contact Betty O’Neal, CAA Instructor at (704) 991-0142 or caa@stanly.edu or visit our website at www.stanly.edu. For more information on this award or on the Centralina Workforce Development Board, please contact David Hollars at (704) 348-2717 or by e-mail at dhollars@centralina.org.

Pictured from left to right: Gaye Wood/Marketing Assistant,Betty O’Neal, Tony Gaddy/Webmaster, James Cotton/Studio Manager, Michelle Peifer, and Shelley Hancock/Marketing Coordinator.

NC Research Campus Update

Here’s The Latest On What’s Happening With this World Renowned Biotech Development in Kannapolis

BioMoto Project Helps Students Improve Fitness and Confidence
Destiny Belk’s science grade has climbed from a C to a B this year. And the eighth-grader at West Rowan Middle School has also lost about 30 pounds. With the naked eye, the two changes don’t seem linked, but Belk says they are.

She attributes the higher grade and healthier physique to the BioMoto project, a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) initiative that combines exercise science with the science behind motorsports.

“I love the exercise you get,” Belk said. “And I’ve become more interested in science.”

Belk is one of 64 eighth-graders in the Rowan-Salisbury School System participating in the program, which is aimed at under-represented populations such as girls and economically disadvantaged students.

West Rowan, North Rowan, Erwin and Corriher-Lipe middle schools each have 16 students split into two eight-person teams.

Students from the Cabarrus and Richmond county school systems as well as the Kannapolis City district are also participating in the initiative, which is being paid for by a $300,000, three-year grant from the Golden Leaf Foundation.

During the fall, students completed a pre-fitness assessment that included a treadmill, strength and bike performance tests at the Appalachian State University Human Performance Lab at the Research Campus.

Throughout the year, they’ve worked on getting more fit by exercising and learned more about the world of engineering by participating in a design challenge to create an apparatus to change tires.

Anne Ellis, the grant coordinator for Rowan-Salisbury and a science specialist at Horizons Unlimited, said the project’s capstone event was held at the Rockingham Dragway this month.

“The event was a culmination of an entire year’s work,” she said.

Ellis said students were judged on four different modules.

The first one tested their physical endurance and technical skills as they worked to change a tire on a replica race car.

Rick Goodman, a bus mechanic with the Rowan-Salisbury School System, traveled to the four middle schools to show students how to use an air impact wrench to remove lug nuts from tires so they would be ready for the competition.

The apparatus students built earlier this year using $250 in supplies was judged based on engineering and innovative quality.

Ellis said their basic problem-solving skills were also tested.

The final module compared students’ overall health and physical fitness measured earlier this year.

“We’ll see how much they’ve improved,” Ellis said.

Ellis said students learned how to work as a team and built self-confidence.

And their also getting a peek inside the world of motorsports and bioengineering.

“This is a whole lot of real world experience they’re gaining,” she said.

As the students enter high school, Ellis said the district plans to track them to see if the project has any impact on their science and math education.

“That’s the hook to this project,” she said. “We want to see students stay interested in STEM fields and have the jobs of the future.”

Sarah Azzarello, the STEM coach at West Rowan, said she’s seen her students respond positively to the program.

“They look forward to the fitness part, the running, the walking laps,” she said. “And they enjoy the camaraderie that it builds.”

But the biggest change she’s seen has come from within.

“Their confidence levels have really come up,” she said.

N.C. State Seeking Students for N.C. Research Campus Internships
N.C. State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI) is looking for interns to work and study at its state-of-the-art scientific facility at the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis this summer. The Institute places interns in labs and fields with leading scientists for three months, offering hands-on experience with real-world fruit and vegetable research that aims to transform human health.

Students in the Charlotte region – both high school and college – are encouraged to apply at the Plants for Human Health Institute website where more details are available.

The positions are paid and full-time from roughly May through August.

“Our internship program is a unique experience,” said Tara Vogelien, director of business operations, Plants for Human Health Institute. “Students have the opportunity to learn and work at the N.C. Research Campus with some of the finest facilities and scientists in the world. That looks great on a resume.”

The N.C. State University Plants for Human Health Institute is part of the N.C. Research Campus in Kannapolis. Its Cooperative Extension outreach is known as N.C. MarketReady. The campus is a public-private venture including eight universities, the David H. Murdock Research Institute (DHMRI) and corporate entities that collaborate to advance the fields of nutrition and health.

Please stay tuned to the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s monthly E-Newsletter for more developments on these exciting stories. For more information on what is going on at the NC Research Campus, please visit the Centralina Workforce Development Board’s website at www.centralinaworks.com.

Mike Goodman, a bus mechanic for the Rowan-Salisbury School System, shows Destiny Belk how to use an air impact wrench.
 
Christine Bradish, N.C. State graduate student and Kannapolis Scholar, researches raspberries at the Plants for Human Health Institute in Kannapolis, N.C.

 


Help Us Do Better By Telling Us More

Every month the Centralina Workforce Development Board works hard at trying to bring you the most up to date and innovative stories from around the region. We try to incorporate information that can be beneficial to both businesses and job seekers, as well as promote the accomplishments that are being done throughout the Centralina region. We want to know what you think of the monthly E-Newsletter. We want to know if the articles are informative and if they are relevant to you and your organization. We’d like to know what you’d like to see more of in the newsletter, as well as what you’d like to see less of. We are looking to improve so that we can give back to you the most cutting-edge and informative newsletter out there.

Please send any comments about the monthly E-Newsletter to Emily Clamp at eclamp@centralina.org. If you are new to the newsletter and would like to see our previous issues please visit them at  our website. We thank you in advance for your feedback and your assistance in our rebranding process!


Game of Life Prepares Youth for the “Real World”

Mooresville Middle School Holds Game of Life Event

On Friday March 2, 2012, Mooresville Middle School held a Game of Life Event for their 7th grade students. Natasha Pender, Centralina WDB Youth Specialist attended this event and participated in budget workshops for youth.

The purpose of the event was to give students insight regarding life beyond school regarding budgeting and managing a household. Students were able to examine budgets, potential situations, and utilized the ability to problem-solve.

During the Game, students were able to choose a career that they were interested in, they didn’t know the salary so they would go with something they were truly interested in. Tables were set up that were manned by volunteers (parents and community volunteers) and the tables represented Real Estate, Transportation, Bills and Grocery. There were also other tables that included more “fun” items, such as cell phone purchasing, and vacation.

Students then received a worksheet that gave them the monthly income of the career that they chose. With that amount of money, they had to determine what kind of car, house, cell phone, etc., to buy with what they had. Bills were determined by the house that they “choose.” Volunteers were then in charge of helping students select an apartment/house to buy, a car to purchase, bills to pay, etc. and making sure that the students had completed their “check register” appropriately.

One time during the course of the event, the students had to visit the Wheel of the Unexpected. Possibilities of turning the wheel included winning the lottery, having an extra baby to support, a free vacation, needing to pay for car/house repairs, paying student loans, receiving an inheritance, going to jail, etc…

The Centralina Workforce Development Board and the Centralina WDB Youth Council are proud partners with the Mooresville Graded School District and was happy to help participate in this fun way to prepare our youth for the “real world!” For more information on the Game of Life event or on the Centralina Youth Council, please contact Natasha Pender at (704) 348-2725 or by e-mail at npender@centralina.org.

Natasha Pender, Centralina WDB Youth Specialist participated in the Game of Life Event at Mooresville Middle School.
 
Students had to roll the “Wheel of the Unexpected” to help them see how a budget can change drastically during the Game of Life event.


Free College = A Chance for Success!

Over 1,000 Attend South Piedmont Community College’s Free College Day

Students age 13 and older got a taste of college and opportunities offered at South Piedmont Community College’s (SPCC) Free College Day. The event began Saturday February 18, 2012 with registrations and check-ins at 8:30 a.m. and classes starting at 9 a.m. Various classes were offered from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Though many preregistered for the event, anyone interested could still register throughout the day to participate in the different classes offered, Rosemary Britt, SPCC’s director of marketing and communications, said. “We just had a huge rush for the 9 a.m. classes,” she said.

As of 9 a.m., 929 seats were filled in the various classes offered. The free event allows people to learn more about what SPCC has to offer and the type of work its students are involved in. More people were expected to sign up for classes later in the day, she said.

“It gives us an opportunity to showcase the college,” she said.

Participants in Free College Day could sign up for up six classes.

“I think people need to be introduced to the community college, I think people need to know what we have to offer, Raymond Griffith, who taught a class titled “The Price is Right” Saturday, said.

Griffith’s class focused on the math and budget calculations necessary to put on the “The Price is Right,” game show. His class was offered at 10 a.m., 11 a.m. and noon.

In addition to SPCC instructors teaching various classes during the day, some SPCC students also participated in the event to show those who registered for classes, what they’ve learned and done while students at SPCC.

“We thought it was a good way to look into South Piedmont (Community College) and to show our passion for it,” Cindy Moss, a student at SPCC, said.

Moss is in her second year at the school and is working toward earning an Associate’s Degree in Nursing. On Saturday, she along with fellow SPCC students gave presentations about how the eye works and pointed out the different parts of the eye using a dissected sheep’s eyeball.

Free College Day provides people with a chance to learn about opportunities at SPCC not only for those entering into college for the first time, but those like himself who have returned to school, Jeremy Pitt, another SPCC student, said.

During Saturday’s event, he gave short presentations about bones and the different types of cells found in the body.

He already has a bachelor’s degree in communications but was interested in going back to school to get into the medical field. He’s working toward getting a nursing degree and plans to start nursing school in the fall, Pitt said.

Those who signed up for Free College Day classes included Union County residents as well as people from other local areas.

“I want to work in the medical field,” Kaitlyn Tate, a Charlotte resident, who attended the event said.

She is home schooled and recently saw a posting about SPCC’s Free College Day and wanted to see what the school had to offer. A little after 9:00 AM, she could be found browsing through a few biology displays along with others attending the event.

“We just wanted to check and see what they had,” Susan Shyckuk, a Pageland, S.C. resident who attended the event with her family, said.

While she and her husband signed up for a ceramics class Saturday morning, her 16-year-old son participated in a robotics class the event offered, she said.

The Centralina Workforce Development Board and the Centralina WDB Youth Council are proud partners with South Piedmont Community College. The Board and the Council are proud to see partners being innovative in ways to reach out to our youth and our current workforce. For more information on the Free College Day or on the Centralina Youth Council, please contact Natasha Pender at (704) 348-2725 or by e-mail at npender@centralina.org.

Gracie Presson, left, and Brittany Plyler, both massage therapy students at SPCC, use a human skull to show the location of specific bones related to theraputic massage. The two volunteered their time as part of the school’s free college day.


Now You’re Playing with Power, Girl Power

Union County Public Schools Seek to Interest More Women in the Engineering Field

The last week of February 2012 was national engineer’s week and the North Carolina Department of Transportation is encouraging more diversity in the field by fostering more interest among women.

Union County Public Schools is also trying to get more girls interested in engineering, Lorraine Collins, former Director of Career and Technical Education, said. “We just completed an initiative where some girls visited from (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and that was awesome,” Collins said.

The district has added engineering classes at Monroe High School, Central Academy of Technology and Arts and Forest Hills High School.

“Monroe High School’s program has been extremely successful,” Collins said. “(It is) the most diverse class I’ve ever seen.”

Pamela Smith, who teaches technology design and innovation at Monroe Middle School, is hoping to see an increase in the girls enrolled in engineering next year. “Especially the eighth grade students so when they get to high school they will be aware of what they offer,” Smith said. She is lining up guest speakers geared toward getting women and minorities interested in engineering and other technical careers.

The Career and Technical Education Department has started revamping the middle school engineering programs one by one. They are attempting to introduce kids to computer programming and engineering at that level so they are more interested in the classes when they attend high school.

“It’s a non-traditional career and when you speak of engineering, you see more males than there are females,” Smith said. “(We are) trying to expose them that this is the 21st century and there are opportunities out there for them.”

Collins said they make every effort to increase awareness among girls and minorities about engineering and technology careers. “The opportunities are there,” Collins said. “A lot of girls don’t necessarily think it’s an area for them.”

There are many things engineers do most girls don’t know about,” said Nazia Sarder, a transportation engineer with the North Carolina Department of Transportation. “You can build bridges and design roads, or you can help reduce air pollution,” she said. “The opportunities are so broad.”

The school is working to add more drafting and engineering classes. They are currently struggling with finding personnel to teach the classes, however the school is planning to progress forward next year with new classes.
The Centralina WDB and the Centralina WDB Youth Council are proud partners with Union County Public Schools. The Board and the Youth Council are excited to their partners connecting youth to possible future careers. For more information on the Centralina WDB Youth Council, please contact Natasha Pender at (704) 348-2725 or by e-mail at npender@centralina.org.


ACCESS to Graduation and to Your Future

ACCESS Graduates First Class in Anson County

ACCESS (Anson County Community Economic Support Services), a faith-based non-profit organization that focuses on economic and workforce development and community revitalization, recently graduated its first class.

Graduates were recognized at a ceremony on Friday January 27, 2012 at the Mary E. Little Community Center in Morven. Friends and family attended to share in the recognition of the accomplishments of the graduates.

Eight students out of 14 enrolled in the program graduated. These students completed a three-month program, during which they learned life management, professional development and job search skills. The program included contributing to the improvement of their neighborhood and the community by volunteering to serve at community functions and clean up community buildings and grounds, in addition to raising support for ACCESS.

Three individuals in the program, Asis King, Maurice Little and Nicole Little, were recognized for never missing a day or an event. Each of them received laptops to help them as they pursue additional education.

“This has been an exciting time for ACCESS and its supporters,” said Priscilla Nunn. “The achievements of the participants make all the hard work we put in to getting the program up and running, worth it. This is a very talented group.”

The next step for program graduates is to continue pursuing the goals established with the help of a community agency mentor and ACCESS. All graduates have either gotten positions or have enrolled in an educational institution. For the next six months, they will meet weekly with the ACCESS team, and attend monthly training.

The Centralina WDB and the Centralina WDB Youth Council are proud partners with ACCESS and congratulates all of those individuals that graduated! The Board and the Youth Council are excited to see this valuable resource grow and encourage the youth in the Centralina WDB region. For more information on the ACCESS or on the Centralina WDB Youth Council, please contact Natasha Pender at (704) 348-2725 or by e-mail at npender@centralina.org.


Tops in the State!

Rowan-Salisbury School Administrators Receive Top State Technology Awards

The North Carolina Technology In Education Society (NCTIES) presented the top state awards honors to two Rowan-Salisbury School System administrators. The announcement was made during the awards ceremony on Friday March 9, 2012 at the annual NCTIES Conference held at the Convention Center in Raleigh, NC.

Phil Hardin, Executive Director for Technology for the schools was presented the “2012 Outstanding Leader Award.” This award recognizes and honors one leader in the state who has demonstrated outstanding achievement and leadership in implementing technology to improve education.

Dr. Judy Grissom, Superintendent for the Rowan-Salisbury Schools, was presented the “2012 Marking IT (Instructional Technology) Happen Award.” This award is presented to an educator and leader in the field of educational technology in K-12 schools. The program identifies and rewards educational technology leaders for their commitment and innovation. Recipients of this award are educators who:

• Apply available technology now
• Move forward and don’t look back
• See students as real people
• Teach through relationships, inspiring, encouraging, nurturing
• Recognize that further change is necessary, but understand that it is a process
• Realize that teacher empowerment is the key element to technology integrations
• Expect success
• Motivate through awareness and access to information

Award recipients are selected from a pool of nominations submitted to NCTIES from across the state. Both award categories were reviewed by a different set of judges.

“It’s great that Dr. Grissom and Mr. Hardin won these state titles. These honors indicate how hard they work and how fortunate we are to have them both in our school system,” states Dr. Jim Emerson, Chairman of the Rowan-Salisbury Board of Education. “Dr. Grissom and Phil are willing to try new and innovative approaches for student success and they are actively trying to keep us as technology leaders in the state. I am very proud of them. I certainly would say that our board is very proud of them both too.”

The Centralina Workforce Development Board and the Centralina Youth Council are proud partners with Rowan-Salisbury Schools and congratulates Dr. Grissom and Mr. Hardin on these wonderful awards! For more information on this even or on the Centralina Youth Council please contact Natasha Pender at (704) 348-2725 or by email at npender@centralina.org.


Combining Business and Education for Careers for Youth

Iredell-Statesville Schools Career Academy and Technical School Gives Students an Edge in the Workforce

A perfect 100 percent of last semester’s allied health students at the Career Academy and Technical School (CATS) in Iredell-Statesville Schools received their certified nurse assistant (CNA) certification. The school is located in Troutman.

The certification is dependent on the passing of a final test at the end of the course. All 44 CATS students who took the test this January can now call themselves CNAs.

“Success is always what you want for the children,” said CATS Principal Larry Rogers. “To be 100 percent pass rate is great. I applaud the teachers that made that happen…to make the kids want to learn.”

The strong performance comes months before a decrease in state funding will cut the allied health program 37.5 percent in terms of spots available to students.

This year, the allied health classes are allocated 16 slots per class. Next year, each class will only be able to accept 10 students.

Judy Honeycutt, Assistant Director of Career and Technical Education for Iredell-Statesville Schools, said the district has had a waiting list for the class before, but not this semester, and that the cuts shouldn’t affect who gets to take the class.

“We will try to provide instruction to any student who meets the qualifications,” said Honeycutt. “I think we’ll be able to accommodate everyone.”

The qualifications to take the class include the ability to pass a background check and drug test. Each allied health student serves an internship at one of the county’s three hospitals or a nursing home, and the internships require the tests.

Allied health instructor Kim Rogers said she was looking optimistically at the cuts to the program.

“I understand (the state’s) purpose,” said Rogers. “It’s going to give us more one-on-one opportunities with the kids, so hopefully we can turn out even higher quality students.”

Students who take allied health at CATS must first take an introductory class by the same name at their home high school. All 44 from last semester who passed the CNA test were seniors. Students in the class now believe it is a valuable stepping stone in the pursuit of their goals.

Not only is the Career Academy and Technical School focusing on allied health careers, but they are looking to embark on new classes. The school is prepared to open enrollment to its new broadcasting and digital media and firefighting classes in the fall, but its sights are set even further in the future.

The Career Academy and Technical School is examining the possibility of installing a heavy equipment repair course at the technical high school.

“There’s a lack of technicians out there,” said Jim Malloy, equipment development manager at Carolina Tractor. “We need to draw interest and enthusiasm at a young age.”

Carolina Tractor is the parent company of Caterpillar, which is the world’s largest construction equipment manufacturer. Caterpillar has pledged to donate $25,000 worth of equipment and materials to the school if the class was approved.

Caterpillar is currently partnered with Central Piedmont Community College and Florence-Darlington Technical College in offering further education from what the class at CATS could teach.

CATS students would not be eligible for service technician jobs with Caterpillar directly after high school, but would be well-positioned for selection into one of the two community college programs. Martin Page, CATS instructor said the training received from the heavy equipment prepare class would expose students to technology applicable to many jobs.

“It’s going to help kids in both ways: getting them into school, and if they don’t want to go to (college), getting them that entry-level job,” said Page.

The school system is still considering adding the heavy equipment repair course at this time. Please continue to look to the Centralina E-Newsletter for updates on the possibility of adding this exciting program to our region!

The Centralina Workforce Development Board and the Centralina WDB Youth Council are proud partners with Iredell-Statesville Schools and congratulates all of those that are now CNAs! The Board and Council are happy to see a local school system connecting youth to direct world experience for real jobs. For more information on the either program mentioned above or on the Centralina Youth Council, please contact Natasha Pender at (704) 348-2725 or by e-mail at npender@centralina.org.

The Career Academy and Technical School in Iredell County offers a successful certified nursing assistant course.

There's a JobLink Near You!

Anson County JobLink Career Center
116 West Wade Street
Wadesboro, NC 28170
Phone: 704-694-6551

Cabarrus County JobLink Career Center
2275 Kannapolis Highway
Concord, NC 28027
Phone: 704-786-3183

Iredell County JobLink Career Center - Mooresville Center
470-A North Broad Street
Mooresville, NC 28115
Phone: 704-664-4225

Iredell County JobLink Career Center - Statesville Center
133 Island Ford Road
Statesville, NC 28625
Phone: 704-878-4241

Lincoln County JobLink Career Center
529 North Aspen Street
Lincolnton, NC 28092
Phone: 704-735-8035

Rowan County JobLink Career Center
1904 South Main Street
Salisbury, NC 28144
Phone: 704-639-7529

Stanly County JobLink Career Center
2215 US Highway 52 North
Albemarle, NC 28001
Phone: 704-982-2183

Union County JobLink Career Center
1125 Skyway Drive
Monroe, NC 28110
Phone: 704-283-7541

For more information on Centralina region JobLink Career Centers, click here.

Commitment to workforce excellence

 
 

What's Happening in the Region?

Comings, Goings, Kudos…

 
  • Doug Paris has been named Salisbury City Manager. Paris replaces former City Manager David Treme who served for more than 25 years. Congratulations Doug!
 
  • Brien Lewis is the new President of Catawba College in Salisbury. He is the current vice president for university development and alumni relations at Winthrop University. Congratulations Brien!
     
  • Craig Peddicord is the new Executive Director of the Statesville Convention and Visitors Bureau. Previously, he worked as the Executive Director of Baltimore County Conference and Visitors Bureau. He formerly held the director of sales and sales manager positions within the bureau. Welcome to the region Craig!
 
  • Nancy Keith has been named the new Director of the Iredell County Cooperative Extension Services. Keith, who has directed the Cooperative Extension programs in Yadkin County since 2007 will start on April 1, 2012. Congratulations Nancy!
     
  • Jennifer Jones has joined the NC Department of Commerce - Division of Workforce Solutions. She will be working in the Field Services Unit as a Programmatic Monitor. Jennifer previously served on the staff of the Mid-Carolina Workforce Development Board and more recently was staff to a workforce board in South Carolina.

  • David Matheny has announced his retirement from NC Vocational Rehabilitation on Friday March 30, 2012.

  • Juawana Colbert left the Charlotte Regional Partnership on Wednesday March 21, 2012 to join the Greater Houston Partnership in April. She will serve as regional economic development manager, marketing and promoting the 10-county region. We will miss you Juawana!
 
 

• Centralina Workforce Development Board meeting
Tuesday April 10, 2012 – 4:30 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – SOUTH campus - Concord

• Centralina WDB Youth Council Meeting
Thursday April 19, 2012 – 10:00 AM
Cabarrus Boys and Girls Club - Concord
Contact: Natasha Pender 704.348.2725 or npender@centralina.org

• Anson County Career Fair
Wednesday April 18, 2012 – 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
South Piedmont Community College – Lockhart-Taylor Center – Wadesboro
Contact: Kristi Phifer 704.272.5460

• Non-Credit to Credit Pathways
Thursday April 19, 2012 – 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
York Technical College – Rock Hill, SC
Cost: $79
More Information: Emily Clamp 704.348.2732 or eclamp@centralina.org

• Union County Career Fair
Friday April 27, 2012 – 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
South Piedmont Community College – Old Charlotte Highway Campus – Monroe
Contact: Linda Kappauf 704.290.5215

• Resume Clinic
Thursday April 5, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Identifying Your Career Options
Monday April 9, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Stand Out from the Competition
Monday April 9, 2012 – 6:00 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Looking for Work at 50+
Tuesday April 10, 2012 – 6:00 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Interview Techniques
Wednesday April 11, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Resume Clinic
Wednesday April 11, 2012 – 2:00 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Looking for Work with a Criminal Record
Thursday April 12, 2012 – 11:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Resume Clinic
Tuesday April 17, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Letter Writing for the Job Seeker
Monday April 23, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Resume Clinic
Monday April 23, 2012 – 11:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Identifying Your Career Options
Monday April 23, 2012 – 6:00 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Stand Out from the Competition
Tuesday April 24, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Interview Techniques
Tuesday April 24, 2012 – 6:00 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• It’s Not Who You Know, It’s Who You Meet
Wednesday April 25, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Looking for Work at 50+
Thursday April 26, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Financial Planning for the Career Explorer
Thursday April 26, 2012 – 2:00 PM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Online Job Hunting
Friday April 27, 2012 – 9:00 AM
Rowan-Cabarrus Community College – R3 Center
More Information: 704.216.7201

• Cabarrus EDC Annual Stakeholder Summit
Friday May 11, 2012 – 11:00 AM
Charlotte Motor Speedway - Concord
5th Floor Ballroom
Cost: $10
Register: Samantha Moose 704.260.8108 or smoose@cabarrus.biz


The North Carolina Workforce Development Training Center Training offers many great training sessions for every workforce development professional. The Center can even do online trainings for you and your colleagues. Some of the great training sessions include: Keeping Your Cool (When Others are HOT!), Assessment: The Foundation of Case Management, Delivering Excellent Customer Service, and Youth Services: A Variety of Topics. These are just some of the great training sessions they can put together for your team. So give them a call and see what they can do for you! Contact Robin Broome at (919) 306-1819 or visit their website for more information at www.ncwdtc.com.

• Coaching as a Catalyst for Helping People Help Themselves
Wednesday April 4, 2012 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm - Hickory
Course Fee: $70
Register: www.ncwia.com

• Former Offenders: Helping You Help Them!
Thursday May 10, 2012 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm - Raleigh
Course Fee: FREE to attend but you MUST Register!
Register: www.ncwia.com

• Time Flying, The Matrix, Org Skills and Your Own True Colors!
Thursday March 29, 2012 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm – Raleigh
Course Fee: $65.00
Register: www.ncwia.com

• Social Media Workforce 2012
Thursday May 3, 2012 – 9:00 – 4:00 pm – Hickory
Course Fee: $65.00
Register: www.ncwia.com

• Labor Market Information: A Guided Tour and More!
Tuesday May 22, 2012 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm – Raleigh
Course Cost: FREE to attend but you MUST Register!
Register: www.ncwia.com

• ONET
Wednesday May 23, 2012 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm – Raleigh
Course Cost: FREE to attend but you MUST Register
Register: www.ncwia.com

• Career Development Facilitator
Tuesday June 26, 2012 – 8:30 am – 4:30 pm – Raleigh
Thursday September 6, 2012 – 8:30 am – 4:30 pm – Raleigh
Wednesday December 12, 2012 - 8:30 am – 4:30 pm – Raleigh
Course Cost: $525.00
Register: www.ncwia.com

 

Visit our website at www.centralinaworks.com to learn more about the Centralina WDB
To send a comment about our E-Newsletter, click here.

To learn more about the Centralina Council of Governments please visit www.centralina.org
CentralinaWORKS is a publication of the Centralina Workforce Development Board. If you do not wish to receive this E-Newsletter in the future, please send a return e-mail and type "REMOVE" in the Subject Line and you will be removed from our distribution list. The CWDB does not share its distribution list with other organizations. Please feel free to share this E-Newsletter with co-workers and other business associates.